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Common Making Sense

Common Making Sense Born in Chicago on March 13, 1972, Lonnie Rashid Lynn, Jr. is said to be one of seven children fathered by the former pro-basketball player of the same name. After dropping out of Florida A&M;, he changed his name to Common Sense before making his debut as a hip-hop artist by releasing a CD entitled "Can I Borrow a Dollar?" His next album, "Resurrection," sparked a feud with West Coast gangsta' rapper Ice Cube, tensions which were only quelled after the two sat down with Minister Louis Farrakhan. He shortened his name to just Common after some losers in a garage band sued him, claiming to have the exclusive trademark for "Common Sense." In 2003, he won his first Grammy for "Love of My Life," a duet he performed with his then fiancée Erykah Badu for the film "Brown Sugar." Ironically, the relationship ended soon after the song's release. Having mellowed with age, Common has now come to swear off he misogyny, militancy and marijuana which marked his early career. Turning a new leaf, he's also embraced vegetarianism and be-come an animal rights activist. He's even expanded him-self professionally, adding modeling (for The Gap) and acting to his repertoire. His first film appearance [Full Story...]
















OTHER ARTICLES OF INTEREST

Common Making Sense
Common Making Sense Born in Chicago on March 13, 1972, Lonnie Rashid Lynn, Jr. is said to be one of seven children fathered by the former pro-basketball player of the same name. After dropping out of Florida A&M;, he changed his name to Common Sense before making his debut as a hip-hop artist by releasing a CD entitled "Can I Borrow a Dollar?" His next album, "Resurrection," sparked a feud with West Coast gangsta' rapper Ice Cube, tensions which [Full Story...]


"African Queen: The Real Life of the Hottentot Venus"
c.2007, Random House $23.95 / $29.95 Canada 161 pages, includes notes & index Review by Terri Schlichenmeyer When people meet you for the first time, what's the one thing they notice first? Do they see sparkly eyes, an unusual hair-do, or a flawlessly lipsticked pucker? Do they note a crooked smile, a distinctive nose, or a scar on your cheek that you got in a sixth-grade fight? It seems as if we all have something that makes us who we [Full Story...]


Medical Apartheid:The Dark History of Medical Experimentation on Black Americans from Colonial Times to the Present
Medical Apartheid:The Dark History of Medical Experimentation on Black Americans from Colonial Times to the Present Doubleday Hardcover, $27.95 528 pages, illustrated ISBN: 978-0-385-50993-0 Book Review by Kam Williams "The experimental exploitation of African-Americans is not an issue of the last decade or even the past few decades. Dangerous, involuntary, and non-therapeutic experimentation of African-Americans has been practiced widely and documented extensively at least since the 1 8th Century... The problem is growing& No other group as deeply mistrusts the American medical system. These subjects were given experimental vaccines known to have unacceptably high lethality, were enrolled [Full Story...]


Thandie is Dandy
Thandie is Dandy Thandiwe Newton was born in London on November 6, 1972 to a mother from Zimbabwe and British father. En route to fame and fortune, the 5'2" cutie pie would remove a "w" and a syllable from her name, which means "beloved." This is ironic because she later played the title character in the screen adaptation of the Toni Morrison novel "Beloved." But Thandie is probably now best known for her work in Crash, where she played [Full Story...]










Sunday, 02/18/2007
Volume No.: 21
Issue: 5